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t.e. 159

t.e. 159

herbarium, medium

The herbariums from Studio Maarten Kolk and Guus Kusters originate from their own vegetable garden. "Firstly the vegetable garden was a study object, but increasingly we saw vegetables as a material. As such we wanted to treasure the garden we had worked in for a year, and represent it on a 1:1 scale. Furthermore we wanted to say something about it from a design point of view. By pressing and drying the plants and as such conserving them, you can – so to say – lengthen the growing process of the plant.

 The herbariums consist of many layers of fabric with plants on top. Pressed between a sheet of glass using wooden clamp a graphic image emerges, which leans against the wall. Together the herbarium pieces form a greyed and abstract translation of the vegetable garden.”

113 x 73 x 6,5 cm

vegetable material, wood, tectile, glass, multiplex, paper.

unique piece
kolk & kusters
flora
arts aplliques
delivery time: 2 weeks
2,190.00amount
1,809.92 for customers outside the EU during checkout

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